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9 Common Obsessions & Compulsions in OCD

9 Common Obsessions & Compulsions in OCD

The most amazing thing happens when you begin to educate yourself about OCD.You learn that those irrational thoughts and fears — the same fears that you spent years trying to...

Do big life changes give you anxiety?

Do big life changes give you anxiety?

  We all experience transitions throughout our lives. Whether they are exciting (moving to a new place, starting a new job, becoming a parent) or unexpected (being let go from...

What is Autumn Anxiety?

What is Autumn Anxiety?

Fall is the season of change. For some people this can mean a season filled with anxiety and sadness which — believe it or not — makes for the perfect...

What is Existential OCD?

What is Existential OCD?

(Trigger Warning: Existential thoughts & ideas) “Existential OCD” or “Philosophical OCD” is not often talked about. But knowledge of this subtype can make all the difference in someone’s road to...

Relationship anxiety

How do you know if you’ve found Mr./Mrs. Right? Well, you don’t.

As someone who has Relationship OCD, I can tell you that accepting this fact is no walk in the park. “What’s Relationship OCD,” you ask?  It is a subset of OCD where the obsessions are focused on themes surrounding relationships and dating.

Lindsay vs. OCD

Lindsay vs. OCD

It all started the night before. I was in the shower using the last of the conditioner, preparing to toss the empty bottle in the trash. In that same moment I remembered my sister was away with friends for the week. Then this thought popped into my head. “If I threw this bottle away when my sister wasn’t here we would be separated and, somehow, she would be stuck in an alternate universe.” I threw the bottle out anyway and the thought came and went. 

Lindsay: 1 / OCD: 0

This would be the beginning of a very long and exhausting 48 hours.

What If?

What If?

What if? This is the question that has held too much power over my life, my values, my goals, my adventures and my chance for new opportunities. I used to think that there must be an answer to these questions. There has to be — right? Because, if there isn’t an answer, that means I just have to deal with not knowing? How do I let these questions go? How can I possibly focus on anything else when the possibility that something bad will happen is just hanging over my head?